Friday, September 09, 2005

The Rumors are Just that - Rumors

I've seen numerous posts on the Autodesk discussion forums lately from people who claim to "have heard" that the ADT development staff is being downsized, or that ADT is not going to be developed beyond the current release, or the next release.

Trust me - ADT is still being developed and in fact, the ADT development team is probably larger now than it ever was in the past. Autodesk is putting a lot of resources into both ADT and Revit Building. Neither product is going away now, or for the foreseeable future.

So if you're using ADT and are using it effectively, don't let idle gossip and false rumors keep you up at night.

4 Comments:

Blogger James Mc said...

Thanks for the clarification Matt. Autodesk are stating the same thing, but the main problem are their vendors. Mine told me ADT will stop development around the 2008 release, even though Autodesk will continue selling it for many years after that (much as they did with LDT). All the resellers here in Oz are pushing Revit and almost refusing to sell ADT.

2:15 PM  
Blogger Matt Dillon said...

I have heard the same thing from other users, however as the employee of a reseller I can state with all confidence that anyone who is telling you this is speculating at best. Autodesk has made no such announcements and has not even indicated that such might be the case. Considering the fact that ADT still represents a huge revenue stream compared to other BSD products, it wouldn't make sense from a business case. I still hold to my belief that IF any product is to "go away" (and I doubt that either of them will for a long time to come), the market will determine which one it is.

2:31 PM  
Blogger talbert said...

ADT or Revit?
If you were going to make a committment to BIM for an AEC firm which direction would you go?

2:00 PM  
Blogger Matt Dillon said...

There's not a black or white answer to that. There's a lot of variables that come into play. To use Autodesk's own terminology, ADT is an "evolutionary" tool and Revit is a "revolutionary" tool. Considering that comparison, one question that comes to mind immediately is "Does your firm possess the ability and does it have the desire to make a revolutionary change or is it more desirable to evolve to BIM in phases?"

For example, many firms are still working in a 2D world where CAD is concerned. Moving to a 3D Revit world is a pretty huge mental shift to make, not to mention having to learn a new software package to boot. While there are those that will tell you that Revit does not force you to work in 3D, I take issue with that and have yet to see anyone using it as a purely 2D tool. On top of that, Autodesk's own positioning is that it is a true 3D building modeler. You can't have it both ways.

That's just one issue to consider. For some firms, Revit is the way to move. For others, it's still ADT. To say one is the best choice over the other requires a thorough evaluation of a firm's culture, abilities, work types and processes, etc., and to make a blanket statement that one is the better solution for architects in general is, in my personal opinion, counterproductive and misleading.

2:10 PM  

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